What would Jesus want to hear when you pray to Him

Sacred Heart of Jesus Picture

You may recall the phrase “What would Jesus do?”  Now I want to write about another question:  What does Jesus want to hear when you pray to Him?

The question came to mind when I thought how Jesus might want us to pray.  There is no real formula, but there is the beginning (ask Him to be with you), the middle (where you and He converse) and then the ending (where you say thanks and say good night, or see You later).  So I decided jot a few things down to be more clear what I think Jesus might want to hear when we pray to Him. I’m not a great expert, but I have read a few books and listened to a few homilies in my years on earth.  So here goes (just think of these and see where maybe you could add a few more things of your own – make the list long!):

  1. You call His name and ask Him to be with you.
  2. You tell him how you did that day (p.m.) or how you are grateful for the new day (a.m.).
  3. He wants you to be as candid as you can be. Give him a lot of ideas on how you wish your day should have been, how you could have done things better, ask His help on some knotty problem!
  4. Talk to Him like He was your best friend because He is. Tell Him you aren’t that happy about someone who is such and such, or tell Him you think that someone you should love is not lovable to you. Things that bother you about the establishment, politics (He won’t take sides in this – He wants your opinion) or, even how the Church is being run. Tell Him anything as long as you think this is true. Just be frank and open. No holds barred. He’s there for you.
  5. Ask Him to watch over you, your spouse, children, parents, siblings, friends – the guy down the street whoever you like – even the President. He will.
  6. Tell Him your needs, your wishes; make it something big, or just a small wish even. You can start small and then ask Him to help with something big – if it’s something good for you.
  7. Ask Him to help you to believe that dreams do come true
  8. Make Him happy by telling Him that you love Him, that you are grateful for His blessings, that you want to believe in Him more and more.
  9. Make Him be your constant friend and companion.
  10. Let Him be Your guide and ask Him to be with you in your work, your play and your quiet rest times

The object in my junk drawer 

 

There is an object in my junk drawer.  It is my New York City Public Library Card.  I don’t really think it is a junk piece.  Not at all.  I used to live in New York (Queens), back in the late ’80’s.  There was a branch of the library a block from my workplace. That was on 1st Avenue and 68th street. Or was it 67th? I would go to the library to borrow books and actually lug them home (walk to the subway, in the subway waiting for the train to arrive, at subway stop where I lived, on the walk home).  I don’t know how I managed to bring books home all the way from Manhattan.

I totally love libraries, and the NY Public Library is such a big and great place to find books of all kinds.  The card is laminated, has a lion on the front, just like the lion statues on the front of the main library and the text that shows my name is in a maroon color.

I found, while I lived in NY, that New Yorkers loved to read on the subway, in the park, in any place where there was a chair and a coffee to drink.  In the subway, one didn’t just stare into space.  They read books, mostly to relieve the boredom of the train ride, and to avoid eye contact.

I don’t know now how New Yorkers read their books.  Do they have their Kindle? Or read on their iPhone Kindle app?  Or do they actually hold an honest-to-God paperback or hardback? I would guess technology would trump tradition in this case.  It is easier to read with a Kindle or iPhone, jostled by other subway riders or hanging by the straps trying not to fall into someone’s space.

I am proud to hold a library card from NYC PL.  It is something so authentically New York.  I should put the card in a frame and have it on display at my desk.  Like a badge of having been through life in New York city.

This library card is a symbol of my literary journey.  I will keep it safe to remind me that the journey is just getting into a groove.

This library card is also a symbol of hope – hope that one day at least one book of mine will share the shelves of the books in the NYCPL or at least, in our own city library.  I don’t really know, however, whether a book, once published, would automatically get added to the NYCPL catalogue of books.  In my city library, the members of the library have to submit book suggestions for their library to buy.  Not all of their suggestions are taken up.  I find that daunting.  I now look at my library card and try to remember what books I actually checked out of the NYCPL.  Most likely, bestsellers.  In fiction, in romance, or mystery.  What else would someone who once worked for a living by growing human cells do to relax their mind?